Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tim Sil80

Changing to smaller battery in S13 (turned sideways)

Recommended Posts

Just grabbed a small 330cca Century Battery in preparation for getting my cooler fitted in the Sileighty. Just wondering if i need to extend either the positive or negative cables and how do people solidly mount their batteries once positioned side on.

 

Any help would be great, any pic's would be awesome too :thumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll go take a photo of mine later tonight.

 

But mine has a extended negative and the positive is just stock. I just have a generic battery clamp to hold it in and it works well.

 

It's a tight fit but works quite well.

 

Ps. I'm under the impression that my negative lead might be even relocated. Not extended, I'll have a look for you later though.

Edited by s13k's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

keep some jumper leads in the car.

 

I had a smaller battery from japan which lasted a long time, but eventually wouldnt start the car if left for 3 days. That was after 3-4 years.

 

I replaced it with the best battery in that size i could afford, and it was dead within 6 months again. Charging via trickle charge didnt help it come back to life.

 

went up to the recommended size and no problems since - left it for a month and it fired first go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

330CCA is low as f**k!

 

maybe if you try cutting out heaps of electricals in the car it might be a bit better... but id say you're probably just better off relocating the battery to the boot or somewhere else :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

330CCA is low as f**k!

 

maybe if you try cutting out heaps of electricals in the car it might be a bit better... but id say you're probably just better off relocating the battery to the boot or somewhere else :/

 

Yeah the car had a big amp and sub in it but i got rid of that quick smart, i dont need the extra weight and doof doof crap in the boot. Prefere to keep the battery out of the car and in the engine bay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what people don't get is that isn't CCA the amount of power to start the car in cold weather? Not a battery expert but I think 330 is fine for Australias climate.

 

Anyone confirm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought that was the case too, never had a problem with 330cca before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the difference between a 330CCA and a 450CCA (i think thats what i have now) is pretty amazing.

 

its like the same difference as 'fat kid running up stairs' (330cca) and 'usain bolt running up stairs' (440cca)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what people don't get is that isn't CCA the amount of power to start the car in cold weather? Not a battery expert but I think 330 is fine for Australias climate.

 

Anyone confirm?

 

CCA stands for cold cranking amps so you are kind of correct, but not cold weather, it's referring to cold starts as in when the engine hasn't been runnig and is completely cold.... Nothing to do with weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the difference between a 330CCA and a 450CCA (i think thats what i have now) is pretty amazing.

 

its like the same difference as 'fat kid running up stairs' (330cca) and 'usain bolt running up stairs' (440cca)

 

I like to think of it more like a marathon, cause the 450 CCA battery isn't going to start your car any faster, it's just going to make it start for a longer period of time and not wear out as quickly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it definitely does make the car start faster. not that i have done any scientific measurements, but its at least 20% higher RPM on the starter motor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it cuts the amount of eh eh eh's before you hear your brumbumbumbum?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it did for mine, and made the eh eh ehs a lot quicker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like mixed opinions on the 330cca batteries, guess i'll see how it goes :thumb:

 

S13k's - Keen to see your pic ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope these photos do you justice, just went out and took them now lol

 

HdG91kN.jpg

 

f97Bmn5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually kinda need to know this difference between the 330cca and 450cca too because i'm just about to put my Blitz front mount in and need to either get a smaller battery turned sideways or relocation into the boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put a battery similar to this one in my drift car a year ago, its lucky to get started once a month and its mounted behind the boot trims where the jack usually goes in my 180, its tiny and has plenty of power to start my car even after sitting for long times

 

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/FULLRIVER-SPORTS-BATTERY-PC680-RACE-AUDIO-HC20-680AMPS-DRY-CELL-/290882178094?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item43b9edcc2e&_uhb=1

Edited by moggys13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

330CCA is enough to crank a SR20

 

Funny enough, even the factory R33 GTS-t uses a ~330CCA battery, which is stored in the boot. I ended up going for an Optima D51T1R which has about 450CCA and 38Amp/Hr + it's sealed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fun fact:

Never changed the battery in my car or even looked at it in general

 

After this thread decided to have a look at it

 

Its a 330 CCA, and i didn't even notice :$

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 180sx has a jet ski battery with 215CCA and it starts fine so don't stress over whether or not 330 will be enough. More powerful batteries will start the car faster but its no big deal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a 330cca in my s13 with a ca18. Starts first time every time when cold - absolutely no issues what so ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're worried about it not starting with a smaller battery, turn all loads off before you shut it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, small low-cca batteries definitely can crank an SR20, but to me they're just a headache I don't need on a street car. I run a 570cca gel cell in an externally vented Jaz box (down from a 700cca dry cell I foolishly forgot to charge for a year), bolted to a welded steel frame in the boot that can be lifted from its studs via 4 nuts. Power is supplied by 2 gauge iirc to a homemade distribution post in the engine bay, meaning jump starting can easily be done from the front or the back.

 

Sure my setup is probably 2.5 times the weight of say a 330cca battery in the engine bay and is overkill for a 2L engine, but the extra weight is well worth it imo. I've run small batteries in past cars and much prefer to do whatever I like and not give a f**k if it will start once I'm done.

Edited by pmod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what people don't get is that isn't CCA the amount of power to start the car in cold weather? Not a battery expert but I think 330 is fine for Australias climate.

 

Anyone confirm?

 

Cold cranking amps is referring to starting yes, the amount of amps it can give to engage the starter motor when cranking.

 

 

I think what people don't get is that isn't CCA the amount of power to start the car in cold weather? Not a battery expert but I think 330 is fine for Australias climate.

 

Anyone confirm?

 

CCA stands for cold cranking amps so you are kind of correct, but not cold weather, it's referring to cold starts as in when the engine hasn't been runnig and is completely cold.... Nothing to do with weather.

 

Well yes weather effects how a cold engine will start, in winter it's harder for the engine to turn over due to resistance etc. The CCA rating is not directly related to weather but the ease in which an engine will turn over will differ in different temperatures.

 

 

 

Rule of thumb, the more current the better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr Pmod if it isn't too much trouble would you be able to post or pm pics of the key points of your setup (if you are able to do it you can leave out the cabin length/part of the wiring setup run between the bay and boot) that would be very helpful as I'm about to do the same thing myself without any prior knowledge or attempts.

 

The ability to jump start from either end of the car also sounds very helpful/detrimental.

 

Mr Pmod if it isn't too much trouble would you be able to post or pm pics of the key points of your setup (if you are able to do it you can leave out the cabin length/part of the wiring setup run between the bay and boot) that would be very helpful as I'm about to do the same thing myself without any prior knowledge or attempts.

 

The ability to jump start from either end of the car also sounds very helpful/detrimental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure Brent, I should have some pics lying around I can send you. The basic concepts for this are really quite simple.

 

The goal was to have a CAMS-approved box in the boot, passenger-side corner, that was secure, removable, and connected to an insulated bolt on the chassis with the thickest possible wire I could be bothered running, run through a fully-sealed plastic tube. The CAMS box means I can track the car if desired, and by running an external vent tube, I can use wet-cell batteries and charge the battery without taking it out of the box.

 

To make the frame, I first welded up a platform out of square tube steel; a basic rectangle with horizontal beams running across it. I then welded two generic battery bracket posts to the frame to act as giant studs, drilled two holes of the correct diameter in the bottom of the Jaz box, then slid the box over the posts. Since the box is plastic, there's no point in bolting it to anything, as it's simply a cover. The battery is then popped in the box and clamped down using a regular bracket. I welded four thick flat bars on the sides of the frame, and bolted them to some studs I had run though the boot floor, using thick washers to spread the load. Once in place, it's reasonably solid, although I may go back and weld on some extra bracing to the flat bar for peace of mind.

 

Running the wire is straightforward enough. I drilled a big hole in the boot floor near the battery, ran a PVC electrical passthrough tube through it to negate chafing, inserted the 2 gauge wire through a tube of electrical conduit, ziptied it to the brake lines (not ideal, but it's well above the chassis rails and will be properly retained in the future), then ran it to the engine bay to the distribution stud. Everything else connects to that as per normal, and because I have a decent battery and a fat cable, the current drop isn't sufficient for me to need to run it to the starter motor first, then to the other lines.

 

Connecting the wires is also quite simple. I drilled holes in the battery box and ran fat bolts through them. Made some 2 gauge battery wires on the inside that connect to the bolts, then had positive and negative connect via ring terminals. The negative I just ran directly to one of the battery bracket retention studs, so it's really short. The positive obviously connects to the long line, although ultimately it will run to a fuse, then to the long wire. You can jump start the car from the bolts on the side of the box, which is what I usually do.

 

The DIY distribution post was simply me refusing to pay $45+ for a f**king bolt on a piece of bakelite, and having the option of any bolt length or diameter I required. What I did was buy a piece of cast steel pipe, cut the end off and welded it to flat bar, which I bolted to the chassis. I then took a threaded plastic end cap, drilled a hole in it, ran a fat bolt through it and secured it with a nut. I then screwed the cap in, tightened it up,sprayed the whole thing black is it looked kind of legit, and connected ring terminals as desired. Thing cost me less than $5, and about 10 minutes to make.

 

Only electrical issues I've had have been due to my alternator dying, and the replacement now starting to lose performance. The installation has been rock solid as far as performance and reliability is concerned. There is no downside to having the ability to jump start the car from either end, as the access points aren't exactly flapping about in the open. There are only upsides to it.

Edited by pmod
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible information mate and very well detailed thank you so much.

I will start collecting parts and get this done while the motor is out so I have maximum engine bay room to work with.

 

Thanks heaps mate : )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure Brent, I should have some pics lying around I can send you. The basic concepts for this are really quite simple.

 

The goal was to have a CAMS-approved box in the boot, passenger-side corner, that was secure, removable, and connected to an insulated bolt on the chassis with the thickest possible wire I could be bothered running, run through a fully-sealed plastic tube. The CAMS box means I can track the car if desired, and by running an external vent tube, I can use wet-cell batteries and charge the battery without taking it out of the box.

 

To make the frame, I first welded up a platform out of square tube steel; a basic rectangle with horizontal beams running across it. I then welded two generic battery bracket posts to the frame to act as giant studs, drilled two holes of the correct diameter in the bottom of the Jaz box, then slid the box over the posts. Since the box is plastic, there's no point in bolting it to anything, as it's simply a cover. The battery is then popped in the box and clamped down using a regular bracket. I welded four thick flat bars on the sides of the frame, and bolted them to some studs I had run though the boot floor, using thick washers to spread the load. Once in place, it's reasonably solid, although I may go back and weld on some extra bracing to the flat bar for peace of mind.

 

Running the wire is straightforward enough. I drilled a big hole in the boot floor near the battery, ran a PVC electrical passthrough tube through it to negate chafing, inserted the 2 gauge wire through a tube of electrical conduit, ziptied it to the brake lines (not ideal, but it's well above the chassis rails and will be properly retained in the future), then ran it to the engine bay to the distribution stud. Everything else connects to that as per normal, and because I have a decent battery and a fat cable, the current drop isn't sufficient for me to need to run it to the starter motor first, then to the other lines.

 

Connecting the wires is also quite simple. I drilled holes in the battery box and ran fat bolts through them. Made some 2 gauge battery wires on the inside that connect to the bolts, then had positive and negative connect via ring terminals. The negative I just ran directly to one of the battery bracket retention studs, so it's really short. The positive obviously connects to the long line, although ultimately it will run to a fuse, then to the long wire. You can jump start the car from the bolts on the side of the box, which is what I usually do.

 

The DIY distribution post was simply me refusing to pay $45+ for a f**king bolt on a piece of bakelite, and having the option of any bolt length or diameter I required. What I did was buy a piece of cast steel pipe, cut the end off and welded it to flat bar, which I bolted to the chassis. I then took a threaded plastic end cap, drilled a hole in it, ran a fat bolt through it and secured it with a nut. I then screwed the cap in, tightened it up,sprayed the whole thing black is it looked kind of legit, and connected ring terminals as desired. Thing cost me less than $5, and about 10 minutes to make.

 

Only electrical issues I've had have been due to my alternator dying, and the replacement now starting to lose performance. The installation has been rock solid as far as performance and reliability is concerned. There is no downside to having the ability to jump start the car from either end, as the access points aren't exactly flapping about in the open. There are only upsides to it.

 

+ 1 rep.

 

Excellent Info about your install. Good Man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×