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GHOSTY

BMI - Body Mass Index, why is it still used?

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Why do people/organisations still use/rely on the body mass index scale to determine if someone is overweight or unhealthy etc?

 

Dividing your height by your weight doesn't tell anything about your body composition, fitness level or physical aptitude...

 

Here is an example of how flawed this scale is:

 

252597_10150963233779370_1662799186_n.jpg

Edited by GHOSTY

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Because for 99% of the population it is a general way of measuring obesity, sure there are exceptions to the rule and if you actually have to take a BMI test for anything you can explain a high reading due to high muscle mass.

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According to my BMI I'm overweight lol. I'm by no means fat tho, if you ask me I'm too skinny.

 

But yeah as above, BMI applies only to average people with an average muscle mass

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

Are you saying that someone like Scotty who is 94kg @ 10% body fat, is classed as 'overweight' on the BMI scale (27), by no means a 'bodybuilder' as far as muscle overflowing on his physique, is in the same position of "health risk" as another individual who also has a BMI of 27 but nowhere near the amount of muscle mass as Scotty? Doesn't seem right dk..

 

(Scotty's dexa scan:)

3f770731.jpg

Edited by GHOSTY

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

Bodyweight does not increase your risk of hypertension, or high blood pressure, percentage of bodyfat does (not counting high salt intake or genetic factors). Assuming you are around 110kg? At that BMI your average person would be 30-40% body fat, assuming you would be around the 20% mark.

 

Somebody at 40% body fat is far more likely to encounter the health risks you mention and many more than somebody at 20%.

Edited by Dr. Cranium

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The Defence Force use it as an estimate to see how much rations a person would need day to day. - Second hand info from an ex-Navy guy.

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

Are you saying that someone like Scotty who is 94kg @ 10% body fat, is classed as 'overweight' on the BMI scale (27), by no means a 'bodybuilder' as far as muscle overflowing on his physique, is in the same position of "health risk" as another individual who also has a BMI of 27 but nowhere near the amount of muscle mass as Scotty? Doesn't seem right dk..

 

(Scotty's dexa scan:)

3f770731.jpg

 

Well done you can take something someone said out of total context and turn it around 100%.

 

 

How is a powerlifter the general f**king population?

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

Bodyweight does not increase your risk of hypertension, or high blood pressure, percentage of bodyfat does (not counting high salt intake or genetic factors). Assuming you are around 110kg? At that BMI your average person would be 30-40% body fat, assuming you would be around the 20% mark.

 

Somebody at 40% body fat is far more likely to encounter the health risks you mention and many more than somebody at 20%.

 

Im currently 125kg at around 20% heres a pic.

558444_448970058466680_2014779717_a.jpg

 

 

 

Being 125kg and 8% is not "healthy" either. You have both taken what i have said out of context. Its going to depend where the fat is deposited. Male obviously visceral adipocity.

 

Regardless of BF being 120-30kg is not going to be optimal for longevity.

 

And this is regarding the general population were bmi is relevant for certain study types , i doubt the majority of the population has my lean mass at my weight so it doesnt make much difference to that research or context. Because chances are powerlifters/bodybuilders of decent size dont take up a large number of the population.

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It is still scientifically relevant when dealing with epidemiological studies and the general population.

 

As stated there are always exceptions to the rule and this is taught. However having extreme muscle mass isnt healthy in a sense either.

 

When used in the right context it is valid.

 

Personally my bmi is currently 39.9, i have excess fat to remove yes however very different to someone with the same bmi who doesnt train. However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

Bodyweight does not increase your risk of hypertension, or high blood pressure, percentage of bodyfat does (not counting high salt intake or genetic factors). Assuming you are around 110kg? At that BMI your average person would be 30-40% body fat, assuming you would be around the 20% mark.

 

Somebody at 40% body fat is far more likely to encounter the health risks you mention and many more than somebody at 20%.

 

Im currently 125kg at around 20% heres a pic.

558444_448970058466680_2014779717_a.jpg

 

 

 

Being 125kg and 8% is not "healthy" either. You have both taken what i have said out of context. Its going to depend where the fat is deposited. Male obviously visceral adipocity.

 

Regardless of BF being 120-30kg is not going to be optimal for longevity.

 

And this is regarding the general population were bmi is relevant for certain study types , i doubt the majority of the population has my lean mass at my weight so it doesnt make much difference to that research or context. Because chances are powerlifters/bodybuilders of decent size dont take up a large number of the population.

 

How did i take what you said out of context?

 

However medically we are both in the same position of risk for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and CVD

 

That statement is wrong, if we are talking vast majority of the population then we can assume you both have fat deposits in the same place, as the vast majority of men do. The obese man most likely has a terrible diet and 40% BF, assuming you both deposit fat around the waist he has a much larger chance (if he does not already have them) of contracting those conditions.

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Well thats the response you get on a phone.

 

Ill re word it.

 

The larger you are in general increases risk and reduces chance of longevity.

 

It also can play a part in developing conditions due to the dietary requirements required to sustain such a large percentage of body mass.

 

Sleep disorders, hypertension and dyslipidemia is usually prevalent in the larger weight classes. Regardless of their drug use. Its simply a side effect of having such a large body mass.

 

Being large and a low bodyfat has its own list of problems also.

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Sleep disorders, hypertension and dyslipidemia is usually prevalent in the larger weight classes. Regardless of their drug use. Its simply a side effect of having such a large body mass.

 

Being large and a low bodyfat has its own list of problems also.

1st world problems

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Sleep disorders, hypertension and dyslipidemia is usually prevalent in the larger weight classes. Regardless of their drug use. Its simply a side effect of having such a large body mass.

 

Being large and a low bodyfat has its own list of problems also.

1st world problems

 

Huh?

 

What does that have to do with anything?

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Oh you don't want to mess with him, he'll bite.

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