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Polish'n

Deadlifting issue/advice seeking.

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Since I started Gym for the army, I feel in love with deadlifting.

 

Now we got the cute/dramatic back story out of the way, I need help.

I want to be able to dead lift A LOT! ( aiming at least 4 plates 1RM )

 

Currently I'm 81kg and 181cm (17yo) and my max was 3 plates 1RM(recorded around march 25th), I do around 100-120kg between 6-8 reps usually, I've had a personal trainer for Back and I have a fairly good idea of proper form( from what I think is right) and I was just wondering, what other exercises could do to improve the amount I dead lift? Also currently when I dead lift, i get a sharp pain at the back of my pelvis ( feels its between my ass cheeks ==' ) any idea why?

 

Thanks!

Edited by Polish'n

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Rack pulls would probably be the closest. But good mornings, back extensions, sumo deadlifts to a degree, and dumbbell deads.

To ur back problem, without directly knowing where u have indicated except back of pelvis. What I think you may be referring to is ur lower end of spinal cord?

Umm what I've read is that 8-9 out of 10 of back problems can be prevented at home.

1. Is streching, a good scratch for bak is lie on your back and hold your knees up and just rock it back and forth just a little.

2. Back problem mainly derive from lack of water. So drink plenty of what because that's what creates spinal fluid which helps reduce back pain.

3. Having a weak core often gives back problems. But I mean u shouldn't be too back given what you're deadlifting.

Hope it helps

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Rack pulls would probably be the closest. But good mornings, back extensions, sumo deadlifts to a degree, and dumbbell deads.

To ur back problem, without directly knowing where u have indicated except back of pelvis. What I think you may be referring to is ur lower end of spinal cord?

Umm what I've read is that 8-9 out of 10 of back problems can be prevented at home.

1. Is streching, a good scratch for bak is lie on your back and hold your knees up and just rock it back and forth just a little.

2. Back problem mainly derive from lack of water. So drink plenty of what because that's what creates spinal fluid which helps reduce back pain.

3. Having a weak core often gives back problems. But I mean u shouldn't be too back given what you're deadlifting.

Hope it helps

 

It happened start of this year when I was snowboarding in europe, miss-calculated a rail wrong as ass first hit the end of it..

It's kinda hard to explain where it hurts -_-

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You don't need fancy crap if you are dead lifting under 4 plates, stuff leg dead lifts, rows and squats. Deadlift once a fortnight.

 

 

As for the back problem, first tip is too not do more than three reps per set, and go get it checked out in person by a professional. Not bros on a forum. Back is not something to mess with!

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stick to rack pulls, stiff legs, and squats.

If your weak off the ground deadlift standing on a plate, works wonders.

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You don't need fancy crap if you are dead lifting under 4 plates, stuff leg dead lifts, rows and squats. Deadlift once a fortnight.

 

 

As for the back problem, first tip is too not do more than three reps per set, and go get it checked out in person by a professional. Not bros on a forum. Back is not something to mess with!

Thanks and I didn't leave it for 'bros' on the forum, just wanted to see if anyone else had the same thing :)

 

stick to rack pulls, stiff legs, and squats.

If your weak off the ground deadlift standing on a plate, works wonders.

Yea, I usually squat with plates under my heels, helps me go lower with a good posture

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nah i dont mean putting plates under your heels.

 

Either stand on a couple of plates or stand on some blocks, so you're deadlifting from a 'higher' position. Means you have to lift the weight from a lower position that what you would have to

if you were standing on the ground.

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Rack pulls would probably be the closest. But good mornings, back extensions, sumo deadlifts to a degree, and dumbbell deads.

To ur back problem, without directly knowing where u have indicated except back of pelvis. What I think you may be referring to is ur lower end of spinal cord?

Umm what I've read is that 8-9 out of 10 of back problems can be prevented at home.

1. Is streching, a good scratch for bak is lie on your back and hold your knees up and just rock it back and forth just a little.

2. Back problem mainly derive from lack of water. So drink plenty of what because that's what creates spinal fluid which helps reduce back pain.

3. Having a weak core often gives back problems. But I mean u shouldn't be too back given what you're deadlifting.

Hope it helps

good mornings and a weak back are not a good move, super easy to do permanent damage doing that exercise with poor form and or too much weight

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Rack pulls would probably be the closest. But good mornings, back extensions, sumo deadlifts to a degree, and dumbbell deads.

To ur back problem, without directly knowing where u have indicated except back of pelvis. What I think you may be referring to is ur lower end of spinal cord?

Umm what I've read is that 8-9 out of 10 of back problems can be prevented at home.

1. Is streching, a good scratch for bak is lie on your back and hold your knees up and just rock it back and forth just a little.

2. Back problem mainly derive from lack of water. So drink plenty of what because that's what creates spinal fluid which helps reduce back pain.

3. Having a weak core often gives back problems. But I mean u shouldn't be too back given what you're deadlifting.

Hope it helps

good mornings and a weak back are not a good move, super easy to do permanent damage doing that exercise with poor form and or too much weight

 

Yeh that's right. Don't do them if you don't know how. Probably better to stick with rack pulls and stiff legs. I wouldn't think seated rows would benefit your deadlifts in anyway though.

That's how Bruce lee fked up his back too.

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Since I started Gym for the army, I feel in love with deadlifting.

 

Now we got the cute/dramatic back story out of the way, I need help.

I want to be able to dead lift A LOT! ( aiming at least 4 plates 1RM )

 

Currently I'm 81kg and 181cm (17yo) and my max was 3 plates 1RM(recorded around march 25th), I do around 100-120kg between 6-8 reps usually, I've had a personal trainer for Back and I have a fairly good idea of proper form( from what I think is right) and I was just wondering, what other exercises could do to improve the amount I dead lift? Also currently when I dead lift, i get a sharp pain at the back of my pelvis ( feels its between my ass cheeks ==' ) any idea why?

 

Thanks!

 

Pull fast and heavy, 1-3 reps, 10-20 sets take many minutes (3-8mins) between sets so you are fully recovered. You need to train to be explosive because explosive is strong and moves heavy weight. If you can train in a gym where you have access to bumper plates and can drop the weight in a controlled but not taxing manner during the down portion of the lift, this will help with your progress greatly by not taxing your energy so much and leving it free for the pull (the important bit, if lifting the most weight is your goal).

 

Use light squats for your warmup - 3 sets 10-20 reps will get the blood flowing.

 

Then start you deadlift session like this

60kg x 10

80kg x 5

100kg x 5

120kg x 3

start your heavy sets 140kg+

 

Make sure you have sucked in air, and made your core tight, and your whole body is ready to lift, then rip the shit out of it and pull. Don't let your back round too much. You should be able to feel when you are ok to grind through a lift, but you'll know straight away when you're not going to get it so just drop and convserve for the next set.

 

Starting off medium-heavy (for you, 120kg), low reps, pulling fast, and adding 5kg (increasing weight) as you go through your sets is great for building confidence, next thing you know you just pulled 140kg for a triple no sweat.

 

speed is key.

Edited by GHOSTY

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Whats 4 plates in kg for total weight? I love the deadlift as well and i started increasing my weight 5kg every week until i got to about 150kg for 4rep/4sets. after that it took me a few days to get the soreness out of my back muscles and so i only did deadlifts every 10 days but now i've started just doing 1 heavy set of 6-10 of 160kg+ and then drop set 6-10 reps of around 110kg.

 

my 1rm is 207kg but in that session i did that twice so probably could've went 210kg for 1

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Without seeing you lift, it's hard to tell you what you need to do to increase your lift.

You say your form is good, but stand on a plate to raise your heels? That's the first thing id be fixing.

 

As far as what other exercises you need to do, with out seeing you near failure, we can't see where you turn to shit, which means we can't fix your weak spots.

 

I found squats brought my deadlift up the most, but I was pulling sumo at the time.

I squatted 3x a week between 80-95% for a minimum of 3 reps for 3 months straight. I did NO deadlifting during this squat-a-thon and my deadlift went from 220kg to 270kg.

 

Since then I switched to conventional, and have found pulling from a 60mm deficit for 2/3 of my training cycle to help heaps. My last session off a plate was 260 for triples, my next 1rm test got 285kg in competition.

 

Pulling from a deficit can be detrimental if you don't do it properly, it's not as easy as just standing on a plate and pulling. You really need to sit back and squat the weight.

 

I'm now training for the world champs which are in Europe mid September, and I will be following a very similar program. Loads of deficit pulls, power shrugs, curls, planks, rows and chins. I'm hoping for 295-302.5 later this year.

 

Key points:

- fix your mobility and technique.

- start a deadlift program, follow it. Dont just go to the gym and lift by feel.

- work on speed

- stay super tight.

- make sure hips and shoulders are moving at the same time.

- get a coach, not a PT if your serious about getting strong.

 

Also, rack pulls are f**king useless. Avoid.

Edited by namsdrawkcaB

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Without seeing you lift, it's hard to tell you what you need to do to increase your lift.

You say your form is good, but stand on a plate to raise your heels? That's the first thing id be fixing.

 

As far as what other exercises you need to do, with out seeing you near failure, we can't see where you turn to shit, which means we can't fix your weak spots.

 

I found squats brought my deadlift up the most, but I was pulling sumo at the time.

I squatted 3x a week between 80-95% for a minimum of 3 reps for 3 months straight. I did NO deadlifting during this squat-a-thon and my deadlift went from 220kg to 270kg.

 

Since then I switched to conventional, and have found pulling from a 60mm deficit for 2/3 of my training cycle to help heaps. My last session off a plate was 260 for triples, my next 1rm test got 285kg in competition.

 

Pulling from a deficit can be detrimental if you don't do it properly, it's not as easy as just standing on a plate and pulling. You really need to sit back and squat the weight.

 

I'm now training for the world champs which are in Europe mid September, and I will be following a very similar program. Loads of deficit pulls, power shrugs, curls, planks, rows and chins. I'm hoping for 295-302.5 later this year.

 

Key points:

- fix your mobility and technique.

- start a deadlift program, follow it. Dont just go to the gym and lift by feel.

- work on speed

- stay super tight.

- make sure hips and shoulders are moving at the same time.

- get a coach, not a PT if your serious about getting strong.

 

Also, rack pulls are f**king useless. Avoid.

 

Thanks for the advice, I gotta change up my whole program anyway, so I'll take them into consideration and I don't put plates under my feet for deadlifts, I only put 2.5kg plates under each heel for squats because they help me go lower, also i have a general satisfaction about my form also, you reckon I should stop dead lifting for a bit ( helping my back recover also? ) and squat every monday,Wednesday and friday?

Edited by Polish'n

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Without seeing you lift, it's hard to tell you what you need to do to increase your lift.

You say your form is good, but stand on a plate to raise your heels? That's the first thing id be fixing.

 

As far as what other exercises you need to do, with out seeing you near failure, we can't see where you turn to shit, which means we can't fix your weak spots.

 

I found squats brought my deadlift up the most, but I was pulling sumo at the time.

I squatted 3x a week between 80-95% for a minimum of 3 reps for 3 months straight. I did NO deadlifting during this squat-a-thon and my deadlift went from 220kg to 270kg.

 

Since then I switched to conventional, and have found pulling from a 60mm deficit for 2/3 of my training cycle to help heaps. My last session off a plate was 260 for triples, my next 1rm test got 285kg in competition.

 

Pulling from a deficit can be detrimental if you don't do it properly, it's not as easy as just standing on a plate and pulling. You really need to sit back and squat the weight.

 

I'm now training for the world champs which are in Europe mid September, and I will be following a very similar program. Loads of deficit pulls, power shrugs, curls, planks, rows and chins. I'm hoping for 295-302.5 later this year.

 

Key points:

- fix your mobility and technique.

- start a deadlift program, follow it. Dont just go to the gym and lift by feel.

- work on speed

- stay super tight.

- make sure hips and shoulders are moving at the same time.

- get a coach, not a PT if your serious about getting strong.

 

Also, rack pulls are f**king useless. Avoid.

 

this guy knows. have followed his advice, my 1rm used to be 160, now my 1rm is 205 and that felt reasonably easy. Could very well pull 210. i had a crack at 5 plates, got it about an inch off the ground and failed. 5 plates will soon be mine!!!!

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Key points:

- fix your mobility and technique.

- start a deadlift program, follow it. Dont just go to the gym and lift by feel.

- work on speed

- stay super tight.

- make sure hips and shoulders are moving at the same time.

- get a coach, not a PT if your serious about getting strong.

 

Also, rack pulls are f**king useless. Avoid.

 

^^^This, especially investing in some time with a lift coach, de-mystifies everything, money well spent IMHO...

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