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Karbonyte

Martial Artists, Boxers, Asskickers in General

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So, I decided to make a general Martial Arts thread instead of whoring out the "why do you train thread"

 

I've done 6 years of TKD, and about a year and a half of Muay Thai and Kali Escrima at the same time, with only a small amount of grappling during this time. I've had about 4 years off now, where I trained at the gym for about a year, and then slacked off, training only a couple times a week. I decided enough talk about getting back into MA's - time to get to the ass kicking. I'm currently training with Phoenix Taekwondo. Only plan to stay a month or two. Its really just so I get my co-ordination and basic kicking technique back. Initial signs are looking good. Sore as a mofo after the first training session on Monday. Still felt it Thursday morning. I went again last night and today I'm only slightly sore, a bit of stretching keeps the soreness at bay. Once I'm back into form, I'll be making my way over to Nino Pilla in the city, for Muay Thai, Kali/Escrima, and Silat and Grappling lessons. Hes the best martial artist I've ever seen.

 

My gameplan is to be a well rounded Mixed Martial Artist, but focus on striking as opposed to the UFC's current trend of Ground n Pount. When it comes to a weapon, the concept of the twin bamboo sticks is my favourite for any type of fighting. I'm not a huge fan of cutting people, I mean, do you really want to bathe in your opponents disease infested blood? So beating them into submission will have to do. I also want to learn some wushu style aerial acrobatics in my own time. Flips, Handsprings, handless Kip ups, Flare kicks, and the like.

 

I've tried judo and wrestling. Its not my thing. My mate is shorter than me and stocky, and just destroys me at it. We've decided its cos of his lower centre of gravity and the fact I cant get through his stocky form. So I'm wanting to learn basically, how to defend against this style and make my way back to my feet so I take his head clean off his shoulders.

 

As for size? I'm 180cm-ish and 75kg. I'd optimally like to be around 80-85. I realise I'm going to need weights to achieve this, but I'd like to get back into optimal striking form first. Using the extra muscle to strike harder will give me that added incentive to do something which I personally find boring and repetitive.

 

Alright, I figure thats enough to start the discussion.

 

What is your style? How long have you done it for? What do you wish to learn?

 

Do it. Do it. Do it.

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I've tried judo and wrestling. Its not my thing. My mate is shorter than me and stocky, and just destroys me at it. We've decided its cos of his lower centre of gravity and the fact I cant get through his stocky form. So I'm wanting to learn basically, how to defend against this style and make my way back to my feet so I take his head clean off his shoulders.

 

So he's tougher/stronger/better than you? I can't believe your giving up because of that. Royce Gracie was about 6'1" and his base and centre of gravity was amazing.

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At judo, he decimates me.

Standing strikes, I am superior.

 

His skill on the ground is better than mine, and we've looked at it together, and we know his build is giving him the advantage there, just as my added height over him gives me the advantage in reach for ranged combat. The f**ker's neck is as almost as thick as his head, he easily slips out of headlocks cos you cant get your arm under his chin.

 

I'm not giving it up - I should have made it more clear. Its not NATURALLY my thing. I said I'm wanting to learn to fight defensively in this manner, not to become a fighter who goes out there in an attempt to ground and pound. To do what I want from it, I will need to learn a lot from it, and not skimp over it. But is not the style I want to fight in primarily, I dont want it to be my "style", because in a street fight, its never 1 on 1 anymore. The wanker always has a group with him, which is why hes getting in a fight with you - to attempt to prove dominance in front of his mates. But it means you've always gotta worry about being stabbed, or stomped by his mates. Which is why I dont want to be on the ground if it is my choice.

 

If it goes to the ground, I want to be able to get back on my feet as quick as I can, in case he does have back up.

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all the gracies are freakish grapplers.

 

That reminds me, i watched a movie last night called "the smashing machine", definetly worth a look at if u like pride and ufc

 

yeah too many heros around now days, there should be a law where they can have compulsary culling of the scum of society

Edited by adamjk

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The only experience I have with MMA are my friends.One was Gene LaBelles number one student and now runs his own place here in Melbourne,one is the only pure mesomorph I have ever met,5'8" and 89kg @ 10% bodyfat,has competed at boxing and Kick boxing,currently grappling,a retired undefeated kick boxer and a boxer who won that Toughest Man contest a few years ago,and $10,000.They all argue about which style is most effective,but in a close in fight in a pub,the strongest guy wins,technique seems to go out the door in a restricted place,as long as the fight stays one on one.

 

I have posted elsewhere about an experiment with one of these fighters and my little brother 6' and 125kg +.On the mat,he destroys them,standing up,he has no hope (or training).

 

Interesting thread,keep it up.

 

I have found though that the bigger you are the less chance you have of ending up in a "situation".

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Did you want to train purely to look after yourself, competition or both. I find that a lot of clubs have poor tactics and mindsets for real "i'm going to cave your face in until your dead" fighting. Don't confuse me for saying they can't teach or fight. How you put it together when it comes to the crunch can make you beat people with much greater skill than you.

 

I know a lot of people get protective about their styles but when I have seen so many people who have awsome techchnique get demolished by people who use pure aggression, it makes you wonder. What M&M said about the strong guy is true most of the times. In saying that as a small bloke I have dropped massive blokes in 1 or 2 hits. My dad in his late 50's in a street rage incedent dropped a massive Maori bloke in one hit. To the body. It wasn't so much the moves but how you go about it. Hint - don't go toe to toe (like sport style) unless your awsome or wrestle especially a strong guy. Stating the obvious I hope.

 

If I fight I treat it like I could die and don't f#ck around( I never ever pick fights). If I have to use a squirrel grip or a thumb to an eye it will be done. If your really into this sort of stuff when you see people fight out in town or where ever, study it and think about what you would have done realistically. You can learn a lot as it's totaly different to in the dojo or ring. Like M&M said technique turns to shit especially against a tough guy. Most of the time. I know when i've bitten off more than I can chew.

 

You fight the way you train and think.

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Its purely self defense. I have no intention of getting more blackbelts or competing.

 

I've done TKD competitions all through my teens, at minimum, 1 every 3 months and never enjoyed it. Throughout my TKD training, my dad has always trained me on the side, in Muay Thai, but it was never formal until after I quit TKD. It meant I had stronger kicks than a traditional TKD fighter, as at that stage in SA, it was still 45* insteps. Flicking and not following through like you do in Muay Thai.

 

Consciously going in with the intention of hurting mates or people I didn't have a grudge against didn't sit well with me. I almost never went all out, but I was still good. Technique and thinking my way through fights. I was TKD State champ. State team. Demonstration team.

 

Only twice have I fought in tournaments in anger. When I went out there in that mindset, I literally destroyed everyone I fought. My form didn't change. I just went out there far more aggresively.

 

I've only been in a couple street, or even school fights. Of the 4, I finished 3 of them in under 10 seconds. The first one began when a guy punched me in the back. So I turned and punched, which then became a hold of the back of the neck, then a leaping knee to the gut. He jumped which resulted in him getting a launched knee to the nuts.

 

Another guy, much heavier than I am, rushed me and shouldered me in the gut with the intention of running me into a tree a couple meters behind me. I managed to keep on my feet, while slipping backwards in the same motion. A dropping elbow to his lower back stopped that guy. I still went sliding into the tree though. I walked away. He squirmed on the ground.

 

And the third one began with a pushing match. Ended that with just a choke hold - slammed him back into a wall and lift him up against it. I'm not strong enough to lift him completely off the ground, but enough he wouldn't have enough footing to try anything stupid. Not having a solid feeling of Earth is a daunting thing when being threatened. When he knew I was seriously going to beat his face in, he tapped out (in a street fight????) and when I loosened my grip, he apologised.

 

When it comes down to it, I agree that there are no rules. Street is.. street. Protect yourself however you have to. I'm not one to start things, but I'll do what I have to in order and try to stop them.

 

My training has always been highly oriented around sparring. I think I've established that I'm not one for repetition. Once I have the technique polished, I want to use it. Not continue to practise it without it being a reaction to an attack. So I spar. Light contact, or full strength with padding. Every fight I've watched on the street or in a club, I've thought about what I would have done, and the consequences. And every time I come up with atleast 1 thing that flows through all of them.

 

Stay off the ground.

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This should be a good thread if we don't get any tough guys who think there the "one". I agree it's best to keep off the ground when fighting for real or get up as soon as a move is done.

 

I find that people who do full contact are much better in real fights as they're more familiar with thier timing and spacing in hitting for real unlike point style training where you tend to pull your shots. They have a feel for hitting and are used to getting hit so are more confident and commited.

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This should be a good thread if we don't get any tough guys who think there the "one".

Yeah I got one thing that keeps me from thinking anything like that. My dad. :(

 

God he beats the crap out of me every time I decide I'm good enough to want to train with him. :lol:

 

I agree it's best to keep off the ground when fighting for real or get up as soon as a move is done.

 

I find that people who do full contact are much better in real fights as they're more familiar with thier timing and spacing in hitting for real unlike point style training where you tend to pull your shots. They have a feel for hitting and are used to getting hit so are more confident and commited.

 

Agreed. Point sparring restricts your fighting too much in where you hit as well. It stops before the fight is won as well and then continues again when both are ready. Not like a real fight at all.

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My dad is also an animal. He scares me.

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I personally think muay thai and boxing are the best MA's to learn if you plan to be getting in a fight out of the ring. BJJ talent seems to go out the window when the user gets a little spooked so all you need to do is deliver a smooth punch to the jaw and its christmas.

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I"LL SMASH AL OF YOUS!!

 

lol jkzz..

 

being doin muay thai for about 7months now 4days a week..

wanted to try some BJJ but, just cant get passed the idea of another sweaty man rolling aoround with me on the floor..

though it's the most practical MA to learn.

if i get more time to train, pending on uni or work comittments i was hoping to start fighting mid next year..

all in all it's my cardio for the week.

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Lol, that's a piss cutter.

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Everyone has a plan.........until they get hit.

 

Mike Tyson.

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Tyson is by far my favourite boxer.

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i did boxing for about a year 4days a week until i sprained my ankle and got too lazy. I'd say my body was pretty conditioned from face, chest, abs and ribs. My weakest points were my legs of coarse.

 

My next training would had been muay thai.

 

either way back then whenever i got into street/clubs brawls you end up doing anything to keep yourself uninjured. Stools, bricks, bottles, etc so one on one clean fight techniques is generally out the window anyway. But im older and smarter now, you punch me i call lawyer.

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Thought this might be of interest for the MMA out there.

 

Powerlifting: Is It The Optimal Supplementary Training Activity For Martial Artists?

 

Charles Staley

If you’re a martial artist or combat athlete who has experienced the unpleasant symptoms of chronic “paralysis by analysis” when it comes to trying to figure out the best types of supplementary training for your sport, let me suggest something that you may not have considered: powerlifting.

 

For clarification, powerlifting doesn’t mean lifting weights quickly, nor does it mean Olympic weightlifting. Powerlifting is the classical strength sport consisting of three events: the deadlift, the bench press, and the squat. In competition, athletes are permitted three attempts for each lift, and at the end of the day, the lifter with the biggest “total” in each weight class wins the contest.

 

Now, in this age of Pilates, “functional training,” and various other fitness trends, you might puzzle over my choice of adjunct training, but give me a moment to make my case and I think I might be able to convert you.

 

The Efficiency-Based Training Paradigm

 

Combat athletes must, first and foremost, think “efficiency.” More isn’t better, BETTER is better. Don’t try to cover all the bases. Instead, try to the most with the least. After all, isn’t that the philosophical premise of all martial arts disciplines?

 

We need to maximize efficiency on two fronts: motor qualities and muscle groups. First, motor qualities…

 

The Most Functional Motor Quality: Maximal Strength

 

If I had to pinpoint the most common mistake made by martial artists with regards to their choices of supplementary training activities, it is redundancy. A few years back I was supervising the training of one of the World’s most highly regarded NHB fighters. I remember asking him to describe his typical training for a given week. He described practicing grappling drills for a few hours, and then, later in the day, going out on his bike for three hours for endurance training. What this athlete failed to consider is that his mat time was more than sufficient to develop the required level of endurance capacity!

 

In my practice with professional and Olympic athletes, I have a formula that I use to help prioritize training tasks:

 

“Focus on elements which are 1) needed, 2) poorly developed, 3) highly trainable, and 4) foundational to other elements, given available resources.”

 

Using this formula as a guide, more times than not, I usually arrive at maximal strength development as being the best use of time and energy. Maximal strength is defined as the most amount of force you can develop in a single maximum effort, irrespective of time or bodyweight. In the gym, it basically boils down to your “1RM,” or the most weight you can lift for one rep, but not two. Maximal strength is best developed through the use of heavy weights (between 85 and 100 percent of your 1RM), moved as rapidly as possible.

 

Why maximal strength? Because for the majority of athletes, it tends to be 1) needed, 2) poorly developed, 3) easily trainable/improvable, and 4) foundational to a host of other motor qualities, including power, agility, anaerobic endurance, and stabilization.

 

Efficiency and Muscle Group Training

 

If efficiency is your objective, there is a simple formula to use when considering exercise selection for developing maximal strength: Use the fewest number of exercises that challenge the largest number of muscle groups with minimal redundancy. The three powerlifting events fulfill this premise quite nicely. In fact, the deadlift alone leaves almost no stone unturned— it trains nearly every muscle in the body, save for perhaps the pectorals (which are targeted with the bench press anyway).

 

Wide-Stance Squatting: Get Strong, Flexible, and FUNCTIONAL

 

There are a number of squatting styles used by competitive powerlifters, but I’d like to make a case for the ultra-wide stance squat. This is the type of squatting used by members of Louie Simmons’ Westside Barbell Club in powerlifting competition. Louie refers to this type of squat as a “wide stance good morning to parallel.” Another way for traditional martial artists to visualize this lift is as a weighted horse stance.

 

For those unfamiliar with this exercise, here’s a brief description: Take a super-wide stance (at least double your own shoulder width, and initiate the squat by cracking your hips and sitting back rather than bending the knees. Try to lower yourself to the point where the tops of your thighs are parallel to the floor when viewed from the side, without allowing your knees to travel forward at all. This will be difficult at first, but as your adductor length improves you’ll eventually be able to do it. Focus on sitting back and pushing the knees out to the sides as you descend, keeping a neutral spine throughout.

 

Screw “Functional Training” and Just Squat!

 

The wide stance squat is a great lesson in true functionality: while it does not outwardly resemble anything you’d normally do in sport or life such as jumping, kicking, or running, in truth, it can improve your functioning in all of these skills far better than more traditional squatting methods that emphasize a narrower stance and increased knee flexion. That’s because the wide stance squat promotes obscene levels of strength in what kinesiologists call the “posterior chain” meaning, the low back, glute, and hamstring muscles— the same ones that propel you in the activities just mentioned.

 

How Much Ya Bench?

 

OK, OK, this lift takes a lot of flak because it’s so widely abused by otherwise talentless dudes at your local fitness center, but let’s not be short sighted. The bench press is like an ivy-league education for almost every upper body muscle you’ve got, and I don’t see any of you volunteering to get punched by a 500-pound bencher either. Powerlifters use a super wide grip to maximize leverage, but combat athletes are better served by taking a shoulder-width grip, which is both safer and more specific to punching and striking skills.

 

Pulling Your Weight

 

The deadlift really is the least performed, least understood, most maligned barbell exercise in the lifting game. Too bad for those who can’t see through the fog of exercise mythology perpetrated by so-called experts and “fitness celebrities” who advise against this lift. To me though, it doesn’t get any better: there’s a loaded barbell on the floor, and the challenge is to see if you can grab that bar and stand up with it. You can’t hide behind supersuits, and you can’t shorten your range of motion to brag about how much you can lift. While we’re on the subject, what’s the deal with the leg press? This device seems to entice every ego-impaired guy who ever lived to load every friggin’ plate they can find, wrap their knees with quadruple-ply titanium/nylon radial tire material, ask their training partner to jump on top of the press for extra shock value, and then proceed to rep out over a 2 inch range of motion. Funny though, anyone who can pull 405 from the floor will out-kick, outrun, out-jump, and out-punch any 1600 pound leg presser, hands-down.

 

If You’re Too Fat, Lift Big Weights, and Leave the Wrist Curls to the Bodybuilders

 

Body composition is an important consideration for all athletes. With few exceptions, fat athletes will improve all aspects of performance more efficiently by dropping excess body fat. And despite what you’ve been told by Suzanne Somers on the QVC channel, the way you lose fat is by expending more calories than you consume. This is accomplished by eating less, exercising more, or (ideally) both. I’ll leave the nutritional aspect of this for another article, but from the exercise angle, let me assure you that squats, deadlifts and bench presses burn FAR more calories than concentration curls and the seated adductor machine.

 

First Empty Your Cup...

 

Get out of the more is better, what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger mindset. Don’t make the strongest link in your chain stronger— make the weakest link stronger. Think more in terms of simplicity and efficiency, and you’ll be a better (and healthier) martial artist as a result. And who knows, if you take the advice in this article you may decide to enter a few power meets and become a more diverse athlete. Fighters can learn a lot from lifters, and vice versa.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Charles Staley is known as the “Secret Weapon” by his Olympic and Professional athletes for his ability to see what other coaches miss. When the elite of the sports world want innovative, “out-of-the-box” solutions in their quest to reach World-class levels of performance, they come to Charles.

 

This is the guy who manna85 was bagging :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Man I can't keep up with all this info M&M.

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The Last Man Standing: Intelligent Strength Training Solutions for Martial Artists

 

Charles Staley

I'm about to challenge one of your most deeply-held beliefs about training with weights. The paradigm in question is so widely accepted that for most it is considered a simple fact of life. You might not even realize that you're a believer, but it's highly likely that you are.

 

As a way of presenting my argument, let me first draw a few parallels between two hypothetical training scenarios- the first is highly unlikely, the second is ubiquitous and all-too familiar. Both, however, are equally absurd.

 

 

 

Scenario One

A traditional martial arts class is in progress. The students are being put through their paces as their instructor leads them through an advanced form, which features a number of extremely difficult maneuvers.

 

Two hours later, the students are still at it, although their ability to perform the more difficult skills has deteriorated noticeably.

 

Six hours after the workout began, the students are still valiantly attempting to execute the kata, however, by this point, three students have dropped out due to sheer exhaustion, while the rest can barely manage to stay on their feet, no less perform anything even remotely resembling the kata they are practicing. Their punches are slow and imprecise, their stances shallow and unstable, their breathing out of control. Trying to actually improve the kata is all but a distant memory at this point as mere survival becomes the new goal of the workout.

 

 

 

Scenario Two

You're in the gym performing a set of squats to failure. You reason to yourself that only an all-out assault on the bar will result in progress- no pain, no gain as they say. So you unrack the bar, step back to clear the rack, and go to war. The first 4 or 5 reps are pretty solid, but after that, you begin to slow down. Nevertheless, you manage to complete 12 reps. This is a personal record for you, but no need for congratulation: rep by rep, your fatigue levels escalate. And the more you fatigue, the less force you exert on the bar. The less force you exert, the less your training targets the fast twitch fibers and the more it targets the slow twitch fibers.

 

Oh, by the way- fast twitch fibers are so-named because they make you fast, while slow twitch fiber development slows you down. Now, what did you say your reason for strength training was??!!

 

If you're feeling somewhat discouraged by the sudden realization that all the weight training you've done (for who knows how many years) is ineffective, take heart- you're not alone! Based on my experiences consulting with athletes for the past 20 years, I'd estimate that well over 99% of those who train with weights subscribe to the erroneous notion that the primary goal of training is to achieve a high level of fatigue.

 

If you're looking for membership in the 1% club, it's time for a paradigm shift. Here it is:

 

The effectiveness of training is not determined by the amount of fatigue it produces; but rather, by the degree to which it improves the skill or quality which is being trained.

 

In strength training (as in most other pursuits), the "quality" of a training session is defined and measured by how closely it approximates your maximum capabilities. For example, if an athlete can perform a power clean with 275 pounds for one rep and not two, this is called "1RM," or "single repetition maximum." This is your 100% quality benchmark for that exercise. In a strength training session, the closer you are to your 1RM, the higher the quality of that session. In another example, if your 1RM is 300 pounds and during a workout you lift 234 pounds, then you are training at 80% of 1RM, regardless of how many sets and reps you perform with that weight. Paradoxically, even a single repetition with 275 pounds is higher quality than an all-out set of 12 reps with 270 pounds, although the 12 reps will certainly result in greater fatigue.

 

Don't miss the point however: a certain amount of quantity is indeed necessary to achieve a good training effect. What we're suggesting is that quality should never be sacrificed for the sake of quantity. This certainly shouldn't be a foreign concept for martial artists! How many times have you heard an instructor preach that "One perfect kick is better than 1000 sloppy kicks" or "Practice doesn't make perfect....perfect practice makes perfect." ? All we're doing is applying the same principle to strength training.

 

 

 

The Need For Speed

OK, now that we're familiar with the concept of 1RM as the maximum quality benchmark in strength training, it's time to examine an important method of improving the quality (and therefore, training effect) of any given weight. However, doing so requires violating another dearly-held belief, something I call "the personal trainer's mantra:" lift weights slowly and under control. Now, the "under control" aspect of this mantra is a truism of course- but lifting weights more slowly than necessary lowers quality, and here's why:

 

For any given weight, more speed equals more tension. And by this point you can hopefully appreciate that more speed leads to better recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fiber- the heavy artillery responsible for elite-level athletic performance (please see the sidebar entitled: "Muscle Fiber Types").

 

 

 

Careful! You'll Poke Your Eye Out With That Thing!

But doesn't lifting weights quickly increase the chance of injury? My admittedly sarcastic answer to this question in seminars is "I don't know...does punching and kicking fast increase the chance of injury?" I'm always amazed how martial artists can spend hours each week delivering lightening fast punches and kicks, yet feel the need to lift weights slowly due to fear of injury.

 

Here's a more refined way of considering the issue of training safety:

 

Danger is relative to preparation: More stress to the tissues does statistically elevate your chance of injury, but it doesn't mean you'll get injured. Think about it this way- if your body can safely handle 1000 units of tension, then 400 units of tension poses a greater chance of injury than 300 units. But it still represents a minimal chance of injury. The whole point of weight training for athletes is to provide the body with a challenge that it could not experience otherwise. If you want to eliminate your chance of injury, you'll also need to eliminate the challenge, which also means saying "bye bye" to the training effect.

 

 

 

Quality Versus Quantity

A recent television commercial which ran during the last Olympic games reflects our love of quantity: the camera zooms in on a fit-looking woman pounding out sit-ups on the track, as she counts "23, 24, 25..." Then cut to another athlete punching out a set of push-ups in a boxing gym, counting "39, 40, 41..." The commercial continues in this way as it follows several athletes repping out on various exercises to the backdrop of heroic music. By the end of the commercial, your hair is standing on end and you feel like driving to the gym immediately. However, the most critical aspect of training, the aspect that is fundamental to training success, is completely ignored: quality.

 

Despite what many athletes and coaches think, more reps at the same weight does not indicate a higher quality set. It indicates a higher quantity set. Compare the following examples:

 

Edward and William can both bench press 315 pounds for a single repetition.

 

In one workout, Ed uses 282 pounds (90%) for 6 sets of 2 repetitions.

 

William uses 220 pounds (70%) for 5 sets of 8 repetitions.

 

End result: Ed gets stronger, despite doing less total work, because he employed higher quality weights in his workout.

 

Of course, William feels more "fragged" after his workout, which gives him a false sense of confidence about his abilities.

 

Ed, on the other hand, still feels quite fresh after his workout, and his sense of confidence is accurate, since his 1RM's are improving month by month. William never seems to get stronger, but remains confident because he's almost always sore- a constant reminder that he's working hard.

 

 

 

Choose Your Method

Ultimately, there are essentially three methods of strength training available to athletes, as outlined by Dr. Vladimir Zatsiorsky in his excellent text Science and Practice of Strength Training:

 

1) Repeated Effort Method: A submaximal weight is lifted for several (typically 8-12) repetitions per set, either to complete muscular failure or close to failure. This is the method which (mistakenly) is almost exclusively used by martial artists. The repeated effort method causes increases in muscle mass, but has a minimal effect on maximal strength, relative strength, and speed strength improvements (please see sidebar entitled "Strength Qualities Required for High-Level Martial Arts Performance.") It also causes post exercise muscle soreness, which can have a negative effect on skills training.

 

2) Maximal Effort Method: A maximal (or near maximal) weight is lifter for a small (typically 1-3) number of repetitions per set. This method leads to significant improvements in maximal strength, relative strength, and speed strength and minimal post exercise muscle soreness. The maximal effort method leads to less gains in lean muscle mass than the repeated effort method. For this reason, it is favored by competitive weightlifters, who must be as strong as possible without gaining bodyweight.

 

3) The Dynamic Effort Method: A light to moderate weight is moved with maximum speed. This method is used to improve the rate of force development (speed strength). As such, it is of enormous value to athletes who must overcome large loads (either their own body or an opponent's body) with great speed.

 

The singular point I'm trying to make in this discussion is that martial artists need to minimize their use of the repeated effort method in favor of the maximal and dynamic effort methods of strength training. These two methods are what success coach Jeff Smith calls "major outcome activities," meaning, activities which have the largest positive impact on being able to experience your major outcome, or primary goal. These two methods have been used by speed and explosion athletes from a wide variety of sporting events for years, yet for some reason, martial artists are slow to adopt these proven methods.

 

Ultimately, hard work (by itself) doesn't cut the mustard in elite-level sport. When the last man is standing, no-one receives medals for working hard. Medals are awarded for being the best. If being the best is one of your major outcomes in life, I urge you to employ the concepts I've presented in this article to your own training.

 

 

11 Powerful Strategies for Maximizing the Results of Your Strength Training

 

1) Never sacrifice quality for quantity. This is the first commandment for athletic success. Violate it and prepare to fail.

 

2) Don't use supplementary training to improve a quality that is already addressed by training and competing in your sport. For example, if you regularly perform grappling sessions which last for long periods of time, it may be a waste of time to do additional training for endurance development.

 

3) Target the weakest link. If you're naturally strong, train for speed and/or endurance. If you're naturally fast, train for strength.

 

4) For athletes, strength training is a supplementary, not a primary, activity. If time and energy are at a premium, focus your efforts on your sport practice sessions before supplementary training activities.

 

5) Minimize redundancy: Redundant systems are a great safety feature in aircraft design, but not such a good idea when it comes to program design. Since there are specific limits to one's time and energy (and since injury and overtraining are a constant threat to athletes and fitness enthusiasts alike), it makes sense to use that time and energy wisely.

 

Thus, a fundamental premise of intelligent program design is that of minimizing redundancy. As an example, during a workout, if you decide upon 2-3 exercises for a single muscle, make the exercises as dissimilar as possible. In other words, if you perform two biceps exercises in the same workout, don't use standing barbell curls and standing EZ-bar curls- the two movements are almost identical save for the slight variation in hand position. Instead, a better choice might be single-arm 45-degree dumbbell incline curls and straight bar preacher curls. Now we have effectively reduced redundancy to a bare minimum.

 

6) When switching to a more quality-based style of strength training, work your way to higher intensities gradually. If you typically perform 10-12 reps a set, don't immediately switch to maximum singles. Instead, spend some time in the 4-6 rep range for several weeks, and then continue toward higher levels of stress as your body becomes accustomed to harder training.

 

7) Organize your training schedule so that strength training follows martial arts training, rather than the other way around. The logic behind this recommendation is that unpredictable activities (e.g., sparring) cannot be easily modified "on the spot" when necessary. For example, if you are more fatigued and/or sore than expected following a strength training session, you won't be able to modify the subsequent free sparring session in order to protect yourself. On the other hand, if you incur an injury during sparring, the subsequent strength training workout can be easily modified to accommodate the injury.

 

8) Terminate the training component when the quality of the performance erodes by 10% of more, NOT when you are completely unable to function!

 

9) Select strength training exercises on the basis of how well they train large numbers of muscles simultaneously, and also by how well they correspond to fundamental movement patterns. Some examples would be squats, deadlifts, and bench presses (and their variations), various types of pullups, lunges, and abdominal exercises.

 

10) If you've never participated in a formal strength training program before, give your body a chance to adjust to the additional stresses involved. Initially, it may be a good idea to reduce the volume of martial arts training activities until your body can adequately adjust.

 

11) Do all of the above and pick up your medals!

 

 

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Strength Qualities Required for High-Level Martial Arts Performance

 

Maximal Strength

 

Maximal strength is defined as the amount of musculoskeletal force you can generate for one all-out effort, irrespective of time or bodyweight.

 

This form of strength can be demonstrated or tested in the weight room during the performance of a maximal, single repetition lift. While only powerlifters need to maximize and demonstrate this type of strength in competition, all athletes need to develop absolute strength as a foundation for other bio-motor abilities such as speed strength, strength endurance, agility, and others.

 

Relative Strength

 

Whereas maximal strength refers to strength irrespective of bodyweight, relative strength is a term used to denote an athlete's strength per unit of bodyweight (his or her "pound for pound strength"). It can be used as a modifier for other categories of strength, such as speed strength or strength endurance. So, if two athletes of different bodyweights can power clean (a display of speed strength) 275 pounds, they have equal speed strength for that lift, but the lighter athlete has greater relative speed strength.

 

Athletes who compete in weight-class events depend heavily on relative strength, as do athletes who must overcome their bodyweight to accomplish a motor task (i.e., long jump, sprinting, etc.). Further, sports which have aesthetic requirements (figure skating, gymnastics, etc.) demand the development of strength without a commensurate gain in bodyweight.

 

Speed Strength

 

Speed strength is defined as work divided by time, where work is defined as force x distance. Therefore, speed strength is defined as force x distance, divided by time.

 

 

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Muscle Fiber Types

 

Muscles are composed of a wide variety of fibers, which scientists classify according to how they function. Traditionally, three categories are used:

 

o Type IIb. These are large diameter fibers capable of producing high levels of force at fast contraction speeds. Known as "fast-twitch" fibers, Type IIbs fatigue very quickly.

 

o Type IIa. These fibers are much like hybrids between IIbs and Type I fibers. They have moderate force producing capacities and moderate endurance capacity.

 

o Type I. These fibers are also known as "slow-twitch" fibers because they have small diameters, have fairly low force output characteristics, and high endurance capacity.

 

Incidentally, as a familiar illustration, a turkey's "white meat" is actually composed of mostly fast-twitch muscle fiber, while the "red meat" is mostly slow-twitch muscle.

 

While this classification format is useful for a basic understanding, the important thing to remember is that in reality, there are not three, absolutely distinct types of fibers but rather a "spectrum." On the one end are the biggest, fastest, strongest fibers which require a very high tension to activate (hence, they are often referred to as "high threshold" fibers), and on the other end are the smallest, slowest, and weakest (but least fatigable) fibers, also called "low threshold" fibers, since it takes only small amounts of muscular tension to activate them.

 

Everyone is born with a certain proportion of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fiber, (called "fiber ratio") and this proportion tends to vary from muscle to muscle. For example, muscles like the pectorals, lats, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius tend to have a greater proportion of fast-twitch muscle fibers, while other muscles like the deltoids, abdominals, and soleus tend to have larger proportions of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

 

As a whole, most people tend to have about a 50/50 ratio of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers, with the extreme cases reaching to a 40/60 ratio in both directions. Those individuals born with a high proportion of fast-twitch muscle have greater potential for strength and power, where people in the other end of the spectrum tend to excel at endurance related events such as distance running, cycling, swimming, and so forth.

 

 

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Charles Staley currently coaches several national and World-Class athletes in a number of sports, including weightlifting, luge, powerlifting, track and field, jiu jitsu, and judo. Charles also developed course content of the certification program known as the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA). He can be reached through his website www.myodynamics.com or by calling 800-519-2492.

 

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Your killing me.

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Hope all this stuff is a benefit to you guys.Seems alot of you are into the Mixed Martial Arts.All falls under the same umbrella.......training,enjoy ;)

 

Boost Your Speed, Flexibility, and Stamina with Russian Dynamic Relaxation Techniques

 

Pavel

Walter Mondale’s brother told a reporter, “People often ask why Fritz is so stiff. He doesn’t want to be seen as pompous, but how loose can you be when you’re constantly self-conscious about trying to stay loose?”

 

This anecdote notwithstanding, you DO have to be conscious about staying loose. Tension and relaxation are the two sides of the performance coin. Tension is strength and power. Relaxation is speed, endurance, and flexibility. The martial arts and many sports demand both. An expert punch stings out like a whip, the fighter’s body loose. But the moment the fist connects the puncher’s body tenses like a statue. Speed got backed up with power and mass. A blink of an eye later the fist is relaxed again as it snaps back to the guard.

 

 

“Tension and relaxation are the two sides of the performance coin. Tension is strength and power. Relaxation is speed, endurance, and flexibility. The martial arts and many sports demand both.”

 

Mastery of relaxation is a hallmark of an elite athlete. Dr. Leonid Matveyev observed that the higher is the athlete's level, the quicker he can relax his muscles. The Soviet scientist observed an 800% difference between novices and Olympic level sportsmen!

 

Which is why Russians, from grade schoolers in a phys. ed. class to elite forces and Olympic athletes, practice special dynamic relaxation exercises in every athletic practice. These exercises featured on the Fast & Loose DVD involve passive movement in one form or another. Say, you are working on relaxing your legs. Pretend that you are trying to shake water off your leg; keep your weight on the other leg and make the relaxed leg vibrate. You should feel like your muscles have turned to fat. Wobbling your muscles with the help of your hands is another option. Finally, you could stand on one leg and rhythmically swing the other back and forth.

 

 

“Which is why Russians, from grade schoolers in a phys. ed. class to elite forces and Olympic athletes, practice special dynamic relaxation exercises in every athletic practice.”

 

Jogging with the emphasis on relaxation is also a form of dynamic relaxation training. Various passive drops are popular for the upper body. For instance, inhale and raise your arms. Let your breath out and let your arms drop as a dead weight. The same thing can be done with the shoulders – watch how boxers loosen up their traps before a fight. Vibrating your fingertips until your hands feel large and heavy is excellent for the arms.

 

Ideally, practice relaxation exercises between sets of your strength exercises and throughout your martial arts or athletic practice. You want to learn to go from high tension to complete relaxation and back in an instant.

 

Russian boxing coaches emphasize the importance of developing the relaxation skill in boxers. They recommend traditional methods that date way back to the warriors of the Southern Russia who would stand in water waist deep and repeatedly slice it with a blade. As fatigue set in, the Cossack would learn to stay maximally relaxed on the downswing and only tense up when the saber connected with the surface. The results were gruesome and awesome: a Cossack could slice a horseman in half, from the shoulder down to the saddle, with a light saber.

 

A saber and open water are not exactly practical, so Russian boxing coaches recommend chopping firewood instead; cutting a log in half with one strike is ideal. An even more accessible setup is a large tire, half dug into the ground or attached to a wall. Just beat it up with a light metal pipe (not a heavy sledgehammer).

 

The following unique and simple exercise recommended by the authoritative Russian Boxing Yearbook operates on a different principle and offers many awesome benefits in addition to the relaxation skill. Namely, improved tension skill, a more powerful punch, a stronger grip, and a more muscular forearm. The author promises that this drill will work your muscles not less intensely then a barbell works a weightlifter’s.

 

Get a large eraser that comfortably fits into your fist, e.g. 1x1.5x3”. Carry it with you all day and squeeze it explosively. Initiate each gripping action from your core – compress! Be maximally explosive – imagine that you are punching. Then relax just as quick as you flex! An expression by a famous Soviet expert on autogenic training, Vladimir Levi, comes to mind: “a mentally relaxed fist”. Eventually you will be capable of a rapid-fire tight-loose-tight sequence – just like good punching. Just don’t pick up the pace if you still have residual tension between reps!

 

Alternate the hands and practice for a few hours a day, which is not as difficult as it sounds because you can carry the eraser with you anywhere you go. The boxing coach reminds you that this and other relaxation exercises are excellent but they do not replace ring experience: fear of getting hit cannot help tighten one up.

 

One of the first karate masters in the US George Matson stated, “…the desired result of our learning is to completely control the muscles of our body – so that while performing a Karate technique we can completely tense the complimentary muscles while completely relaxing the antagonistic muscles… Achieving complete control over your muscles is perfection. Those who have achieved a high degree of this control are said to possess “Ki” or ”Chi”.”

 

Russian dynamic relaxation techniques will help you get there faster.

 

 

“Achieving complete control over your muscles is perfection.

Those who have achieved a high degree of this control are said to possess “Ki” or ”Chi”.”

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M&M is spot on. I trained/competed in MA for a little over 6 years. When you get to state and national comp. level, weight lifting becomes part of your training routine.

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a Cossack could slice a horseman in half, from the shoulder down to the saddle, with a light saber.

 

And here I was thinking lightsabers were a thing of fiction. :P

 

Found out some really interesting news today. TKD has really changed. More protective clothing (omg wtf, this is meant to be a Martial Art, not American Football!!!) and the point scoring system has changed. It used to be, 1 point per kick to the body or head, excluding the back of the head or body, or 1 point for a punch to the body. Now its 1 point per body hit. 2 points per head kick. 3 points per backspinning kick.

 

It used to be, most points at the end of the match wins. Now its first to 12, or if you lead by 7, the match is ended and you win. Very interesting news. Now I want to compete in a comp just to see how the new rules would effect the sport. Seems to make you want to be much more aggresive and "tricky"

 

The competition class is taking a break for a few weeks as it was the Nationals comp last weekend. So its a good time for me to get my kicking technique polished again.

 

Flexibility doesn't seem too bad. I have one of those stretching machines where you sit in it with your feet straight out infront of you. Then you rotate a handle and it basically increases the angle between your legs. Eventually you do the splits. Anyone have any objections to me using it on a scientific basis? Got it out the store room the other day, only got to 105* before I nearly cried. Held it for a good 30 seconds though.

 

Hmm, time to work on those fast twitch fibers I guess. Bah. So much for giving up on weights. So basically, make sure I'm warmed up in all my joints and muscles, then lift light - medium weight as fast as I possibly can?

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Hey just thought id add that ive been doing tkd since 1999- 2005 bout 6 years. Then i stopped coz it just wasnt giving me what i wanted. The traning that was done at my club was non contact and during my younger years it didnt bother me too much but as i gerw older it began to bother me quite a bit due to the fact that i felt that i could do all the sparring etc. that i wanted but when it came to a real life situation it would be a whole different story. Also the people at my traning centre werent the most athletic and was not too much of a challenge for me. So in the end i decided to stop.

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Hey just thought id add that ive been doing tkd since 1999- 2005 bout 6 years. Then i stopped coz it just wasnt giving me what i wanted. The traning that was done at my club was non contact and during my younger years it didnt bother me too much but as i gerw older it began to bother me quite a bit due to the fact that i felt that i could do all the sparring etc. that i wanted but when it came to a real life situation it would be a whole different story. Also the people at my traning centre werent the most athletic and was not too much of a challenge for me. So in the end i decided to stop.

Yea good idea, you should (now) head to nuggets gym (north side brissy).. that's some pretty heavy sparring that will be beneficial in real life ;)

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Let me start by saying I never get into a situation unless its 100% unavoidable.

 

Krav Maga.. only just started a few months ago after a run-in at a club (long story), trained few years in TKD when I was younger.

 

I like the idea, dont know if I could bring myself to use some/most of the techniques in real life situations unless I really felt my life was threatened, could see myself ending up in more trouble than its worth.

 

They actually dont teach some of the techniques for that exact reason.

 

For those of you that dont know, it shares a lot of techniques with other martial arts, Boxing/Savate/Muay Thai (for the punches, kicks, elbows and knees) Ju-Jitsu/Judo/Wrestling (for the grappling and disarming techniques), tho the training is quite different. There are no hard-and-fast rules or form, so far the techniques I have learned focus on maximum damage/efficiency in real life conditions.

 

One of the things I love about it is they train you to use your own natural reflexes, so your not locked into any particular form, its very aggressive, with the aim in any situation to go from defending to attacking as quickly as possible.

 

Once again.. 100% self defense.

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Very similar to what I learn. It's all i'm interested in is that type of unarmed combat. Where abouts is this place in Brissy?

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